SAN ANTONIO, Texas — The man who gunned down 26 people at a Sutherland Springs church in Texas’ deadliest ever mass shooting should not have been able to buy the assault style weapon he used, but the store that sold it to him can’t be sued because a federal database failed to flag his past assault conviction, the Texas Supreme Court ruled Friday.

SEE RELATED: Timeline of church shooting in Sutherland Springs

In a unanimous ruling, the state’s highest civil court threw out multiple lawsuits against Academy Sports + Outdoors brought by survivors and families of victims of the 2017

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The store conducted the required federal background check, which didn’t reveal the gunman’s past assault conviction, the court said.

SUTHERLAND SPRINGS, Texas — The man who gunned down 26 people at a Sutherland Springs church in Texas’ deadliest ever mass shooting should not have been able to buy the assault-style weapon he used, but the store that sold it to him can’t be sued because a federal database failed to flag his past assault conviction, the Texas Supreme Court ruled Friday.

In a unanimous ruling, the state’s highest civil court threw out multiple lawsuits against Academy Sports + Outdoors brought

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Academy Sports and Outdoors, where the shooter purchased a Ruger AR-556 semi-automatic rifle that included a 30-round magazine, had appealed after two lower courts declined to dismiss lawsuits that arose from the 2017 mass shooting.

Agreeing with Academy, the Supreme Court ruled Friday that the petitions were prohibited by the U.S. Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act, which protects retailers from lawsuits arising from criminal acts by third parties.

The law, passed by Congress in 2005, bars most lawsuits in federal or state courts with only limited exceptions, none of which applied to the Academy sale, Justice Debra Lehrmann

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